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Lojack for Seniors?

Lojack's SafetyNet bracelet for seniors

Lojack, the company best known for auto recovery systems, has created a senior recovery system of sorts for those with Alzheimer’s, dementia and other cognitive disorders. Dubbed the SafetyNet bracelet, this tracking software is embedded in a band that can be worn around a senior’s wrist or ankle.

Caregivers who want to equip a loved one with this bracelet must enroll the senior in the Lojack SafetyNet program. Once enrolled, the senior is assigned a radio frequency and a digital verification number. They are also given the SafetyNet bracelet, which looks like a hospital wristband, to wear at all times.

The caregiver will then enter information about the senior into a secure database that is accessible by qualified law enforcement personnel. This information includes a physical description of the senior, along with any medical conditions they may have. You can even include notes about the best ways to interact with this person, should they be confused, scared or agitated when they are located.

If a senior goes missing, the caretaker will alert local authorities, who have access to the SafetyNet database and can pull up their notes. The search and rescue team, which receives specific training and certification for the SafetyNet program, can utilize the senior’s specially assigned radio frequency signal to locate the individual.

Lojack states that its tracking system should work anywhere, regardless of whether a loved one has entered a wooded area, garage facility or office building. In other words, the radio frequency is extremely strong and precise. The SafetyNet bracelet is also waterproof and durable, so it should work even if a senior falls or gets caught in inclement weather.

The program does have some downsides, however. Caregivers must test the bracelet’s battery daily to ensure it’s working properly, and the battery and wristband must be changed monthly. While these don’t sound like huge tasks, many caregivers are already bogged down with more than they can handle. Testing, changing and replacing these parts frequently could become tedious for some.

There is also the issue of coverage. Since law enforcement and search and rescue officials must undergo training to participate in the SafetyNet program, not every agency in the country is participating yet. You must fill out a questionnaire, which will no doubt be used to sell you the SafetyNet program, just to see if there is a participating agency in your area.

Finally, the SafetyNet program is not covered by most private insurance companies, according to Lojack. It’s also not covered by Medicare, though it is covered by Medicaid in a few states if you fill out a waiver form. Lojack notes that it hopes to one day get full, nationwide coverage for Medicare and Medicaid participants.

This device clearly has some benefits to caregivers and seniors. However, at its current stage, there are also a few downsides. Plus, there’s no telling whether a senior, even one with cognitive disabilities, will voluntarily leave the bracelet on. We’ll continue to follow this program for you, and will provide any updates as more information becomes available.

 

If a senior goes missing, the caretaker will alert local authorities, who have access to the SafetyNet database and can pull up their notes. The search and rescue team, which receives specific training and certification for the SafetyNet program, can utilize the senior’s specially assigned radio frequency signal to locate the individual.

Lojack states that its tracking system should work anywhere, regardless of whether a loved one has entered a wooded area, garage facility or office building. In other words, the radio frequency is extremely strong and precise. The SafetyNet bracelet is also waterproof and durable, so it should work even if a senior falls or gets caught in inclement weather.

The program does have some downsides, however. Caregivers must test the bracelet’s battery daily to ensure it’s working properly, and the battery and wristband must be changed monthly. While these don’t sound like huge tasks, many caregivers are already bogged down with more than they can handle. Testing, changing and replacing these parts frequently could become tedious for some.

There is also the issue of coverage. Since law enforcement and search and rescue officials must undergo training to participate in the SafetyNet program, not every agency in the country is participating yet. You must fill out a questionnaire, which will no doubt be used to sell you the SafetyNet program, just to see if there is a participating agency in your area.

Finally, the SafetyNet program is not covered by most private insurance companies, according to Lojack. It’s also not covered by Medicare, though it is covered by Medicaid in a few states if you fill out a waiver form. Lojack notes that it hopes to one day get full, nationwide coverage for Medicare and Medicaid participants.

This device clearly has some benefits to caregivers and seniors. However, at its current stage, there are also a few downsides. Plus, there’s no telling whether a senior, even one with cognitive disabilities, will voluntarily leave the bracelet on. We’ll continue to follow this program for you, and will provide any updates as more information becomes available.

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0 Responses to Lojack for Seniors?

  1. Patrick Roden February 18, 2011 at 5:25 pm #

    You are SO on trend…Wonderful resource.

    Patrick Roden

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